• Image for "An argument for free speech."
    Culture and Society,  Politics,  Top Stories

    An Argument for Free Speech: Challenge Begets Progress

    Maybe it came in the form of racism or sexism, such as in the cases of Roseanne Barr, Quinn Norton, or Sarah Jeong. Maybe it was someone whose jokes were too foul, such as former Guardians of the Galaxy director, James Gunn. Maybe it was even the President of the United States and his alleged description of the country of Haiti. No matter what your political or ideological beliefs, chances are that some figure or topic in the recent news will have confirmed it for you: there are certain things that we simply cannot say. But should we not be allowed to use this kind of language? Should any language or topic that could be considered too grotesque or dangerous be…

  • Evolution of conflict stencil graffiti on Vali-ye-Asr Avenue in central Tehran
    Culture and Society,  Psychology,  Top Stories

    New Conflict Theory: No Inequality Necessary – Only Humanity

     You’re not haunted by the war, Dr. Watson. You miss it. – Sherlock: A Study in Pink. Humans crave struggle; a mountain to climb, that we might reach the top and experience that brief, euphoric moment of pride in what we’ve overcome. We desire purpose, a cause for which we can fight, and a battlefield that gives us the opportunity to do so. But how does this fit into a modern society whose primary function is to prevent this kind of struggle, to protect us from these battles? PTSD and Nostalgia In 1992, a young woman named Nidzara Ahmetasevic was wounded by a Serb tank round in the siege of…

  • A broken clock
    Culture and Society,  Politics

    A Broken Clock Is Sometimes Right: And So Is Your Enemy

      We’ve all been there: You look up at the TV in your local bar and are appalled to see your least favorite politicians talking about something or another. Shaking your head in disgust at everything being said, you quickly find a way to distract yourself from the drivel being uttered by the faces on the screen. Of course, the volume of the TV is too low – and the volume of the people sitting next to you too high – to actually hear what the politicians are saying, but you know that they are horrible, and so must be every word that is being said by them. It’s a…

  • Student body at Philip Harding Harvard Commencement, May 2014
    Civil Rights,  College and University

    Affirmative Action: A Band-Aid on Student Inequality

      Last year, Harvard University celebrated its second consecutive year of a non-white majority freshmen class, with 50.9% of admitted students coming from minority groups. On the surface, this would seem to be an indictment of the White House’s recent reversal of the Obama administration’s stance on affirmative action as proof that the system has yielded what was promised by it: diversity and equal-opportunity in American universities. However, a closer look at how Harvard managed to achieve these goals suggests that these achievements exist only on the surface, as the opportunities afforded by affirmative action are anything but equal. A breakdown of the demographics of Harvard’s class of 2021 shows…

  • Polar bear activist for climate change
    Climate Change,  Psychology

    Why America Isn’t Unified in the Fight against Climate Change

      Since its introduction to popular culture, climate change has been an issue divided on party-lines. This division appears to be growing, as according to a Gallup poll by EcoWatch, the number of democrats who believe in man-made global warming has risen from 87 to 89 percent in the past year, while the rate for republicans has dropped from 40 to 35 percent in that same time frame. This partisan divide makes climate change an excellent campaign platform for democratic politicians…but it also renders it completely ineffective at achieving any real environmental progress. Even to those that believe the science supporting man-made global warming is incontrovertible, it must be clear…